You don’t hear about Skype too often nowadays, do you? Since Discord launched four years ago, it has exploded in popularity as one of the web’s leading text and voice chat platforms on Windows, macOS, and Linux. It’s geared towards gamers, but Discord servers exist for interests of all kinds.

One significant advantage Discord holds over Skype is the ability to create a community-powered server, complete with text and voice functionality. This is a step above group chats, which both Skype and Discord support, and has allowed websites, friend groups, and streaming communities to connect in a meaningful way.

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    However, with great power comes great responsibility. Servers large and small require moderation, especially if they’re public. Luckily, Discord offers a robust API that has spawned thousands of public bots. In May, Online Tech Tips covered setting up a Discord music bot – one of the most popular kinds of bots.

    In this article, let’s check out the three best and most trustworthy public bots for moderating and controlling your Discord server.

    Tatsumaki

    Tatsumaki is a recognized name for two reasons. It’s the name of a character in the One-Punch Man anime, and it’s also a feature-rich Discord bot.

    Tatsumaki’s most famous functionality is its profile system. Allowing Tatsumaki in your Discord server allows your server members gain experience (XP) and credits from chatting in text channels and using certain commands.

    With XP, your server members compete for the highest server level. With credits, users can purchase badges, backgrounds, and other goodies to augment their profile.

    However, Tatsumaki is often overlooked for how effective an all-purpose moderation bot it is. Tatsumaki offers text-based commands to kick and ban users from the server, as well as blacklist users from using the bot.

    You can also disable commands entirely or in specific channels. Tatsumaki’s t@prune command is one of the most useful, which allows permitted users to delete a specific number of messages based on the user, text found in message, type of user who sent the message, and more.

    Lastly, Tatsumaki’s t@notify command enables a powerful, automated feature that create a public log for your server. Using it, you can enable or disable notifications per channel, for when users join/leave the server or a voice channel, change their nickname, or are banned or kicked.

    Check out Tatsumaki’s list of commands here. Click here to invite Tatsumaki to your server.

    MEE6

    Like Tatsumaki, MEE6 has its own leveling system – a big draw to bots of this kind. However, it has some very unique features of its own.

    First is the ability to create custom commands through MEE6’s web dashboard. For example, you can create a condition so that if a user types the !gimme command, the bot gives them a specific role.

    MEE6 also features welcome messages and automated role assignment. Many Discord servers will automatically assign new users a role, either for certain permissions or to change their name color from the default (white). MEE6 fully supports this.

    MEE6’s moderation features supports kick, ban, mute, and temporary mute commands. However, one of the main reasons people love this bot is because of its automated moderation system.

    MEE6 includes a user infractions system, and through that, the bot can hand out punishments on its own. For example, you can set it so that a user who reaches three infractions will be automatically muted. At five infractions, you can have them banned from the server for a day. Speaking of which, timed banning is another big feature that MEE6 supports.

    Definitely look into MEE6 if you’re setting up a large moderation team. These automated actions help create safe and consistent moderation guidelines. While there isn’t a full list of commands on its website, you can join MEE6’s support server here.

    Dyno

    Dyno is a fully customizable server moderation bot that specializes in automation. While bots like Tatsumaki and MEE6 put a lot of development into custom systems that revolve around leveling and chat incentives, Dyno is all about server management.

    With Dyno, you can do just about everything via text commands: set up moderators, make announcements, manage roles (manually or through an automated ranking system), change nicknames, purge users or messages, kick, ban, mute, deafen, softban, warn, and more.

    Dyno also supports playing music in voice channels, along with a few playful commands that enable random quotes, jokes, and cute pictures of dogs, but it’s mainly designed for server owners who want full control. This bot should have everything you need when it comes to moderation, role assignment, and custom commands.

    Check out Dyno’s list of commands here. Dyno can be invited to your server by logging into its web panel.

    According to Discord Bot List, these three bots can be found in millions of Discord servers. They are three of the most popular bots on the entire platform, so their security and stability should far exceed alternatives. Knowing that, you can trust each of these bots with high-level permissions.